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‘Memoirs of a Madman’ Ozzy Osbourne solo career retrospective CD/DVD/Vinyl due October 7 (video)

by on Jul.23, 2014, under CD/DVD RELEASES, LINKS, ROCK NEWS, VIDEO

‘Memoirs of a Madman’  Ozzy Osbourne solo career retrospective CD/DVD/Vinyl due October 7 (video)

'Memoirs of a Madman,' an audio and video collections celebrainge the legacy of Ozzy Osbourne will be released on October 7th via Epic Records/Legacy Recordings. It will be available as a single CD, two DVD set, 180g double vinyl and limited edition picture disc vinyl.

17 of Osbourne’s biggest solo hits will be featured on the single CD, with it also available on vinyl from two LP's (standard 180-gram pressings or special edition picture discs). The CD/double-DVD set will include music videos, unreleased and out-of-print live performances, and interviews.

Over the past few days Ozzy fans helped to unscramble the cover art for the release by using the hashtag #OzzyRules on Facebook and Twitter. to unlock the image.

‘Memoirs of a Madman’ CD Track Listing

‘Crazy Train’
‘Mr. Crowley’
‘Flying High Again’
‘Over the Mountain’
‘Bark at the Moon’
‘The Ultimate Sin’
‘Miracle Man’
‘No More Tears’ (edit)
‘Mama, I’m Coming Home’
‘Road to Nowhere’
‘Perry Mason’
‘I Just Want You’
‘Gets Me Through’
‘Dreamer’
‘I Don’t Wanna Stop’
‘Life Won’t Wait’
‘Let Me Hear You Scream’

‘Memoirs of a Madman’ DVD Track Listing
DVD 1
‘Bark at the Moon’
‘So Tired’
‘The Ultimate Sin’
‘Lightning Strikes’
‘Crazy Train’
‘Miracle Man’
‘Crazy Babies’
‘Breaking All the Rules’
‘No More Tears’
‘Mama, I’m Coming Home’
‘Mr. Tinkertrain’
‘Time After Time’
‘Road to Nowhere’
‘I Don’t Want to Change the World’ (Live)
‘Changes’
‘Perry Mason’
‘I Just Want You’
‘See You on the Other Side’
‘Back on Earth’
‘Gets Me Through’
‘Dreamer’
‘In My Life’
‘I Don’t Wanna Stop’
‘Let Me Hear You Scream’
‘Life Won’t Wait’
‘Let It Die’

BONUS
‘Mama, I’m Coming Home’ (alternate version)
The Making of ‘Let Me Hear You Scream’
The Making of ‘Life Won’t Wait’

DVD 2
Rochester, N.Y. 1981
‘I Don’t Know’
‘Suicide Solution’
‘Mr. Crowley’
‘Crazy Train’

Ozzy’s Bunker

Albuquerque, N.M. 1982
‘Over the Mountain’

MTV 1982

New York, N.Y. 1982
‘Fairies Wear Boots’ (clip)

Ozzy’s Bunker

‘Entertainment USA’ 1984

Kansas City, Mo. 1986
(Jake E Lee, Phil Soussan, Randy Castillo)
‘Bark at the Moon’
‘Never Know Why’
Ozzy’s Bunker
‘Killer of Giants’
‘Thank God for the Bomb’
‘Secret Loser’

Ozzy’s Bunker

Philadelphia, Pa. 1989
(Zakk Wylde, Geezer Butler, Randy Castillo)
‘Bloodbath in Paradise’
‘Tattooed Dancer’
‘Miracle Man’

MTV 1989

Marquee, U.K. 1991
(Zakk Wylde, Mike Inez, Randy Castillo)
‘Bark at the Moon’ (clip)

Studio 1992

San Diego, Calif. 1992
(Zakk Wylde, Mike Inez, Randy Castillo)
‘I Don’t Want to Change the World’
‘Road to Nowhere’

Japan 1992
Ozzy’s Bunker
‘No More Tears’

Studio 1992
‘Desire’

MTV 1992
‘Mama, I’m Coming Home’

Studio 1992

‘Ozzmosis’ Recording Session 1995

Ozzfest 1996
(Joe Holmes, Robert Trujillo, Mike Bordin)
‘Perry Mason’

‘Fame & Fortune’

Tokyo, Japan 2001
(Zakk Wylde, Robert Trujillo, Mike Bordin)
‘Gets Me Through’

‘Fame & Fortune’

Ozzfest 2007
(Zakk Wylde, Blasko, Mike Bordin)
‘Not Going Away’

‘Black Rain’ Photo Shoot

Las Vegas, Nev. 2007
(Zakk Wylde, Blasko, Mike Bordin, Adam Wakeman)
‘I Don’t Wanna Stop’

‘Scream’ Recording Session 2010

London, England 2010
(Gus G, Blasko, Tommy Clufetos, Adam Wakeman)
‘Let Me Hear You Scream’

Philadelphia, Pa. 1989
(Zakk Wylde, Geezer Butler, Randy Castillo)
‘Flying High Again’

Tokyo, Japan 2001
(Zakk Wylde, Robert Trujillo, Mike Bordin)
‘Believer’

Pre-order the collection here. Check out the promo clip:

Ozzy Memoirs of A Madman cover

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‘Jason Becker’s Not Dead Yet’ benefit show highlights featuring Steve Morse, Richie Kotzen, Uli Jon Roth, Gus G., and more (video)

by on Jan.31, 2013, under LINKS, ROCK NEWS, ROCK TOUR DATES, VIDEO

‘Jason Becker’s Not Dead Yet’ benefit show highlights featuring Steve Morse, Richie Kotzen, Uli Jon Roth, Gus G., and more (video)

Steve Morse (Deep Purple), Richie Kotzen (Mr. Big, Poison), Uli Jon Roth (Scorpions) and Gus G. (Firewind, Ozzy Osbourne) were some of the musicians who performed at a special concert on January 23rd at Slim's in San Francisco, California, reminding the world that Jason Becker's Not Dead Yet. Proceeds from the second Jason Becker's Not Dead Yet festival (the first one was held in March 2011) will go towards medical supplies for Jason as well as a trust fund to provide for his future security.

Jason Becker, a onetime guitar prodigy first known as part of the metal duo CACOPHONY, was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig's Disease) at age 20, shortly after joining David Lee Roth's band for the gold-selling 1991 album "A Little Ain't Enough". Although the disease robbed him of his ability to play guitar — and eventually left him both paralyzed and unable to speak — Becker continues to compose music with the help of computers, collaborators, and a system of communication using eye movements that was devised by his father Gary.

Even after his once prodigious axe skills left him, Jason's music continued to earn the respect of his peers. Joe Satriani called 2001's "Perspectives" — Jason's first recorded work after losing his motor functions (originally self-released in 1996) — "a triumphantly powerful and beautiful album." Fellow virtuosos joined the chorus of praise, including Steve Vai, who said, "Jason has discovered a brilliant source of inspiration within himself. His deep soul searching has resulted in a body of music that reveals courage and insight and is deeply moving."

Jason's original partner in CACOPHONY, Marty Friedman added, "To call Jason a genius is an understatement. He doesn't cater to trend, target audiences, marketing gimmicks or anything like that. He plays out the emotions from his heart and makes real music that is a salute to the human spirit. Jason is a prodigy and on 'Perspectives' he realizes his miraculous potential."

Jason's most recent album, 2008's "Collection", is a mix of old recordings and new compositions, with guest guitar work from Satriani, Vai, Friedman, Michael Lee Firkins, and Greg Howe.

The January 23rd Jason Becker's 'Not Dead Yet festival' at Slim's in San Francisco was a tribute to Jason and celebration of his amazing story, as well as an opportunity to educate music fans and guitar aficionados about the effects of ALS and the quest for a cure. The idea for the show originated with Bay Area guitarist Dave Lopez of FLIPSYDE and BANG DATA.

The DVD version of the documentary film "Jason Becker: Not Dead Yet" was made available on December 18 via Kino Lorber.

For more on Jason Becker and his fight with ALS, go to http://www.jasonbeckerguitar.com/

Here's a 43-minute video of highlights from last week's concert:

Jason Becker's Not Dead Yet 2013

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‘Jason’s Not Dead Yet’ II Festival featuring guitarists Richie Kotzen, Steve Morse, Uli Jon Roth, Gus G. and more announced

by on Jan.14, 2013, under CD/DVD RELEASES, LINKS, ROCK NEWS, ROCK TOUR DATES

‘Jason’s Not Dead Yet’ II Festival featuring guitarists Richie Kotzen, Steve Morse, Uli Jon Roth, Gus G. and more announced

Steve Morse (Deep Purple), Richie Kotzen (Mr. Big, Poison), Uli Jon Roth (Scorpions) and Gus G. (Firewind, Ozzy Osbourne) are among the musicians who will perform at a special concert on Wednesday, January 23rd at Slim's in San Francisco, California, reminding the world that Jason Becker's Not Dead Yet. Proceeds from the second Jason Becker's Not Dead Yet festival (the first one was held in March 2011) will go towards medical supplies for Jason as well as a trust fund to provide for his future security.

Jason Becker, a onetime guitar prodigy first known as part of the metal duo CACOPHONY, was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig's Disease) at age 20, shortly after joining David Lee Roth's band for the gold-selling 1991 album "A Little Ain't Enough". Although the disease robbed him of his ability to play guitar — and eventually left him both paralyzed and unable to speak — Becker continues to compose music with the help of computers, collaborators, and a system of communication using eye movements that was devised by his father Gary.

Even after his once prodigious axe skills left him, Jason's music continued to earn the respect of his peers. Joe Satriani called 2001's "Perspectives" — Jason's first recorded work after losing his motor functions (originally self-released in 1996) — "a triumphantly powerful and beautiful album." Fellow virtuosos joined the chorus of praise, including Steve Vai, who said, "Jason has discovered a brilliant source of inspiration within himself. His deep soul searching has resulted in a body of music that reveals courage and insight and is deeply moving."

Jason's original partner in CACOPHONY, Marty Friedman added, "To call Jason a genius is an understatement. He doesn't cater to trend, target audiences, marketing gimmicks or anything like that. He plays out the emotions from his heart and makes real music that is a salute to the human spirit. Jason is a prodigy and on 'Perspectives' he realizes his miraculous potential."

Jason's most recent album, 2008's "Collection", is a mix of old recordings and new compositions, with guest guitar work from Satriani, Vai, Friedman, Michael Lee Firkins, and Greg Howe.

The January 23rd Jason Becker's 'Not Dead Yet festival' at Slim's in San Francisco is a tribute to Jason and celebration of his amazing story, as well as an opportunity to educate music fans and guitar aficionados about the effects of ALS and the quest for a cure. The idea for the show originated with Bay Area guitarist Dave Lopez of FLIPSYDE and BANG DATA.

The DVD version of the documentary film "Jason Becker: Not Dead Yet" was made available on December 18 via Kino Lorber.
For more on Jason Becker and his fight with ALS, go to http://www.jasonbeckerguitar.com/

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Zakk Wylde Rock N’ Roll Roast Recap (video)

by on Jan.21, 2012, under FUNNIES, ROCK NEWS, VIDEO

Zakk Wylde Rock N’ Roll Roast Recap (video)

The first-ever Rock & Roll Roast with Guitar World Magazine honoring Zakk Wylde (Ozzy Osbourne, Black Label Society) took place last Thurday noght (Jan. 19) at The Grove in Anaheim, California. It was presented by Epiphone Guitars and sponsored by Monster Energy Drink, EMG Pickups, Revolver Magazine, Marshall Amplification, Dunlop, Eagle Rock Entertainment and Samson, with a portion of all proceeds going to the MusiCares charity.

Roastmaster Sharon Osbourne told Rolling Stone exactly what she had in mind for the roast. "I’ve got to be step on his balls tonight," she said of Wylde. "I’ve known him since he was 18. He calls me 'mum,' and I feel like his mom. So I can be disrespectful, horrible, mean to him for two hours and get away with it."

For Osbourne though, it was all done with a great deal of love. "My kids grew up with Zakk. Jack was about eight months old when Zakk first came to the band. My son is now 26 and having a child, so that’s how long he’s been with us," she said. She also spoke on behalf of her husband, Ozzy, who was scheduled to be there, but is now in England working on the Black Sabbath album. "Ozzy is very proud of Zakk – very, very proud. He’s proud of the man he’s become – he's sober and fabulous."

Others there to pay tribute and trash Zakk included: Fozzy's Chris Jericho, Anthrax's Scott Ian, Slipknot and Stone Sour's Corey Taylor, as well as comedy and roasting vets Jim Norton, Brian Posehn, Jim Florentine and more. A video bit featured Wylde's wife emerging from under a table and a very pleased William Shatner teasing Wylde. Also speaking via video were Judas Priest's Rob Halford, American Idol judge Randy Jackson and contestant James Durbin, with whom Wylde performed on the show last season, as well as Steel Panther, the Ultimate Warrior, Stone Cold Steve Austin and Ozzy Osbourne guitarist Gus G.

Some of the best one-liners included:
Comedian Brian Posehn to Chris Jericho: "Comedy is hard, isn't it? Stick to sucking at everything else."

Comedian Jim Norton to Scott Ian: "You look like Ben Kingsley eating a raccoon." [referencing the Anthrax guitarist's trademark beard.]

Current Ozzy Osbourne guitarist Gus G. to Zakk Wylde (via video): "Zakk, I grew up learning all of your riffs and solos. Then I learned how to play real music."

Scott Ian on Zakk Wylde: "Zakk's guitar playing is way less diatonic and way more gin and tonic."

Zakk Wylde on Sharon Osbourne: "There's a lot of faces up here, and Sharon's is probably the newest. I'm kidding, Mom. You don't look a day over artificial."

Zakk Wylde on Scott Ian: "Scott's been playing lots of poker lately, and like Anthrax, they can both barely pull a full house."

Zakk Wylde on Corey Taylor: "Corey Taylor was in a Tenacious D cover band called Pugnacious P. Now he's in a Nickelback cover band called Stone Sour."

Brian Posehn to Scott Ian: “So you're responsible for Linkin Park and Limp Bizkit (thanks to Anthrax's early collaboration with Public Enemy on a remake of 'Bring The Noise'). On behalf of everybody, (screw) you."

Posehn offered a detailed breakdown of potential future honorees. "I think Ozzy would be a good one, I think Lemmy (Kilmister, Motorhead) would be good. There’s a lot to make fun of and he seems like he has a sense of humor," he said. "Lars (Ulrich, Metallica) would be good, James (Hetfield, Metallica) would be horrible. You could not go after James Hetfield. (Megadeth's Dave) Mustaine might be good. I’d be a little afraid of him, depends on what day you catch him."

Ulrich and Osbourne were popular choices. But Sharon Osbourne had a different metal icon in mind for next year, one that we would pay to see. Asked who she'd like to see roasted in 2013, she replied, "I think Axl Rose, and I’m the woman to fuck him."


Fast Tube

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Ozzy Osbourne bassists past & present talk and celebrate today’s reissues, Ozzy says next album to return to “classic rock band record” and Jack Osbourne interview

by on May.31, 2011, under INTERVIEWS, ROCK NEWS

Ozzy Osbourne bassists past & present talk and celebrate today’s reissues, Ozzy says next album to return to “classic rock band record” and Jack Osbourne interview

To celebrate the today's (May 31) release of the reissues of "Blizzard of Ozz" and "Diary of a Madman", Ozzy Osbourne bassists past and present: Rudy Sarzo (1981–1982) and Rob "Blasko" Nicholson (2003-present) were part of a joint interview and relived some of the highlights of their time with Ozzy.

Long revered by rock fans around the world, these two albums created a template for hard rock in the 1980s and beyond as they were marked by the groundbreaking and historic union of Ozzy and the late guitar hero Randy Rhoads. These definitive versions of 1980's "Blizzard of Ozz" (with previously unreleased bonus tracks) and 1981's "Diary of a Madman" are available individually on vinyl or CD, or together in a deluxe collector's box. All versions were restored and remastered from the original analog sources by George Marino.

Q: What do you think of when you think of Ozzy Osbourne?

Rudy Sarzo: With Ozzy, I was personally a fan before I joined the band. Once I joined a band, that took it to a whole different level. When I think of Ozzy now, I think of playing with Randy Rhoads. Randy was responsible for me joining the band since he and I played together in Quiet Riot. When Ozzy was looking for a bass player way back in 1981, Randy recommended me. It was my first arena band. Before then, the most people I'd played to was a full house at the Starwood in Los Angeles which held about 1,000. That was about it. As soon as I started playing with Ozzy, we were doing arenas, stadiums, and so on. Not only was I playing with the most incredible band I've ever had the pleasure and privilege to play with, but it was also virgin territory for me. It was the spark of everything that I've done ever since.

Blasko: Like Rudy, I was clearly a fan first. Ozzy is my boss, but he's my friend as well. It's an honor to be able to get on stage and play all of those songs with him. There's a 40-year lineage of awesome music.

Q: What has Ozzy's impact been on you personally?

Rudy Sarzo: He and Sharon gave me my first break. I went from sleeping on the floor to having a chance to become who I am today. The only reference that they had was Randy recommended me. I could've been a total maniac, but they gave me a shot [Laughs]. I will be forever grateful. I also learned the difference between the real deal and bullshit by being in Ozzy. Once you play with Ozzy, you know what the real deal is.

Blasko: That's true. It's twofold in a way for me. Black Sabbath and Ozzy Osbourne are my demographic. The only reason I even play music is because of Black Sabbath. Now, here it is, I'm 41 years old and I'm actually playing with the guy who's the reason I play music. It's weird. How often does that happen? You're actually playing with the guy who made you want to play music in the first place.

Rudy Sarzo: We've all started out as fans. I've been a fan of music a lot longer than I've been a professional musician. To actually get to play with our heroes--the people who got us into doing what we do — is an incredible blessing.

Blasko: Growing up, you don't even think you'll meet your heroes, let alone play music with them. The reason why Ozzy is so real is if you ask him the same question, he'll give you the same answer. He grew up worshipping The Beatles. The only reason he plays music is because of The Beatles. You wouldn't think that Ozzy would be starstruck. He was beside himself when he got to meet Paul McCartney. In his mind, he's in no way the icon that we look at him as. That's why his fans relate to him so much. He doesn't put himself as bigger than they are. He may be the guy on the stage, but he's not out of the spectrum of being a fan as well. He doesn't buy into his own hugeness.

Q: What are your favorite Ozzy songs to play?

Rudy Sarzo: For me, it would be the usual suspects — both albums that were out at the time, "Blizzard of Ozz" and "Diary of a Madman". As a band, we enjoyed playing any of the songs.

Blasko: The opportunity to play any of the songs is fine with me. What's better: getting on stage and playing in front of 10,000 people or tarring a hot roof in the San Fernando Valley for a living? [Laughs] It doesn't matter song we play. It's better than doing anything else.

Rudy Sarzo: The crowd will go crazy even before Ozzy goes on stage because they anticipate craziness and the unknown. Every show is completely different. You never know what's going to happen. Even as a member of the band, you don't know what's going to happen. It's amazing to see a crowd reaction that never wavers throughout the whole set. It does climax at the end, but the energy never gets any lower than chaos at the very beginning.

Blasko: That's because Ozzy won't let it happen. If the crowd is sleepy, then Ozzy gets angry about it. He'll throw buckets of water on them. That's his M.O. That's his business. He gets up there, and he kicks ass. He's giving the energy, and the crowd gives it back. Towards the end, you break out "Crazy Train" and "Paranoid" and you get the obvious lift because those are the song everybody in the crowd knows. There is no significant dip over those two hours on stage. It's a consistently energetic audience all the way through. It's pretty intense.

Q: What's the effect that he has on the fans?

Rudy Sarzo: When I first joined the band, it was his crossfade period going from Black Sabbath to becoming a solo artist. Most of the people who came out to see us on the "Blizzard of Ozz" tour were Sabbath fans. They seemed to be a little bit more hardcore. Later on, as we evolved, we started getting more of a crossover audience. It was a younger demographic. Also, there were females which I don't really think were a part of the Black Sabbath audience [Laughs]. It just has a broader appeal. I think a lot of it has to do with Sharon and her vision of what Ozzy is as a performer. That made a huge impact on what Ozzy has become today. Ozzy is known to the heavy metal community. He's also known to people across the world. Everywhere he goes, people know who he is. It's not just the typical places we tour at either. It's anywhere in the world. Rob, what have been some of the most obscure places you guys have been to where people mob Ozzy?

Blasko: It doesn't matter. Everywhere is the same. On this last run, we went to four countries that he'd never even been to in his career ever, and it was the same. They're huge places sold out with Ozzy fanatics. Ozzy is a cultural icon. In some ways, he surpasses some guy in a rock 'n' roll band and goes into overall icon status to where I almost get the feeling that the majority of people in the audience are only Ozzy Osbourne fans. It's like that's all they listen to and those are the only records in their collection. His are the only t-shirts they have. They're just Ozzy's fanaticals. That's the vibe I get. A lot of heavy metal fans are fans of multiple bands. They've got all the different patches on their jean vests. The Ozzy crowd seems like a mob of fanatical Ozzy fans.

Rudy Sarzo: You're definitely right. There are metal fans who are fans of many different bands, but every metal fan is a fan of Ozzy.

Blasko: You have to be.

Q: How has Ozzy evolved? How has he stayed the same?

Rudy Sarzo: When I was in the band from 1981 to 1982, he hadn't quite reached the legendary status that he has today. Even then, you could really sense that Ozzy was going to be as significant as the band he started out with. He is as significant as Black Sabbath or even more so. That is a very rare feat because no other lead singer has ever done that. Mick Jagger has never become bigger than The Rolling Stones. Roger Daltrey has never become bigger than The Who. Robert Plant has never become bigger than Led Zeppelin.

Blasko: Rudy and I have joked about this before. He wrote that book, "Off the Rails", about his time in Ozzy and I'd read it. It's funny that I read it 28 years later from his time period, and I'm going, "Not a whole lot has changed." The drug abuse and violence are gone, but the overall daily workings of the Osbourne camp are the same as they've always been. That's just the way it works.

Q: How important is the bass to Ozzy's music? Can you speak to the role of Ozzy's bass player?

Rudy Sarzo: When I was in the band, I played some of the best bass lines I've ever played. Geezer Butler was an iconic bassist. Those parts were not only challenging, but they were fun to play. You were going to go out there and do some significant playing and performing every show.

Blasko: It's unbelievable. The bass lines on "Blizzard of Ozz" and "Diary of a Madman" are so significant. They're their own animal. They're unlike anything in Black Sabbath or any other Ozzy stuff even. It's cool that I live down the street from Rudy because Ozzy just gave us a bunch more songs off of those first two albums to learn. I'm just going to bring my bass to Rudy's house and have him show me how to play "S.A.T.O." and "You Can't Kill Rock 'N' Roll" [Laughs].

Rudy Sarzo: Right before the "Diary of a Madman" tour, we had a lot of time to rehearse. We learned the whole album, and it was fantastic.

Blasko: "Diary of a Madman" is indescribably awesome. There's nothing like it.

Rudy Sarzo: What amazes me is that "Blizzard" was recorded six months before them going in to record "Diary". The musical growth in the band was incredible.

Q: What's Ozzy's place in music history?

Rudy Sarzo: I think Ozzy has got so much more to accomplish that I can't really place him right now. He's not even halfway there. C'mon, he's Ozzy Osbourne! Just saying his name tells you where he is in history. He's way above and beyond any other significant musician or star in the music industry today. Who else compares to him? I can't even come up with anybody.

Blasko: There's no one else. Even those first ten years of Black Sabbath history were so crucial. That was the birth of a genre of music that's still going strong. It grows every year into a bigger monster. I'm pretty sure that those four guys from Birmingham didn't plan on this. They just didn't want to work in a steel factory. Creating what they did is a heavy responsibility, and that's historically significant.

Rudy Sarzo: When rock music reinvented itself in the early '90s, I could hear so much of Black Sabbath in bands like Soundgarden, Alice In Chains, and the whole Seattle grunge movement. There was so much Sabbath in there.

Q: Any last thoughts about Ozzy?

Rudy Sarzo: Having been a member of Ozzy Osbourne's band is the thing in my career I'm most proud of. It's been incredible just to be a part of his journey.

Blasko: It's an honor. Without a doubt, it's the greatest experience of my life. There's so much history and respect there. There's no greater honor than to be in a band with such genuine, generous people. Their generosity comes from the heart, and it's a real thing. It's powerful. My life has been changed forever for the better because Ozzy and Sharon are in my life.

Rudy Sarzo: I couldn't have said it any better.

In a recent interview with Metal Messiah Radio's "Heavy Metal Thunder" show, Ozzy stated about his planned follow-up to 2010's "Scream", "I wanna get more back down to basics with this next album.

"I haven't got a title. I've written a couple of ideas down. But I can't really give you much more information. It's not gonna take a long time, I don't think. All I can say to you is I've got a few ideas for songs, but I don't wanna say when it's going to be released because I don't know myself.

"I don't stick to a formula. I just try and experiment a lot. 'Scream' was more like a an experimental album because I didn't have a band at the time. (Guitarist) Gus (G.) came along and the guys played on the album after I'd done a lot of the work myself and my producer, Kevin Churko, in my studio."

Ozzy Osbourne's current touring drummer, Tommy Clufetos, told the "Talking Metal" podcast that early work is already underway for a follow-up to "Scream" and that he thinks Ozzy is "going to return to a classic rock band record." Clufetos added, "What he has expressed is that he wants to make it the band playing live in a room so wherever that takes us. Less technology and more amps and drums."

Ozzy recorded much of "Scream" in a studio at his home in Los Angeles with producer Kevin Churko, doing most of the writing and recording on computers. He told The Pulse Of Radio he liked working that way but wanted to do something different next time out. "At the end of the day, the end result was pretty cool, but I don't know whether I want to continue to do it that way," he said. "I like to — like the earlier albums, I'd go rehearse and jam out with the band, get some, like, vibe going, you know. I want to incorporate that and this new technology thing, next album."

Clufetos told "Talking Metal" that Ozzy and the touring band have already begun working on song ideas between shows on Ozzy's latest tour, saying, "We are already coming up with new ideas backstage, in the hotel rooms and at soundcheck and have a bunch of ideas recorded . . . time will tell what happens with them."

God Bless Ozzy Osbourne, directed by Mike Fleiss and Mike Piscitelli, takes us from Ozzy 'The Prince of Darkness' Osbourne's early days in Birmingham, England, through his Black Sabbath and solo career, and his phenomenal hit reality television show, to the drug and alcohol abuse and the havoc wreaked on Ozzy and his family. Together, in exceptionally candid interviews, his children and wife paint a picture of their life with Ozzy.

It does not look like the Mona Lisa. Here's a Cynthia Ellis interview with Jack Osbourne from Huffingtonpost.com:
huffingtonpost Q&A with Jack Osbourne

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