Metallica and Lou Reed talk “Lulu” and hanging with eclectic crowd in GQ Magazine 2011 Music Issue

Metallica and Lou Reed talk “Lulu” and hanging with eclectic crowd in GQ Magazine 2011 Music Issue

Oct 26, 2011

The GQ 2011 Music Issue is out now, and in it the magazine profiles rockers Keith Richards (covered in my last post), the Black Keys, David Johansen of New York Dolls, Mick Jones, Debbie Harry, Robert Plant, Jack White, Iggy Pop, Beck and more. The website is releasing a new profile each day, and have already posted this one on Metallica and Lou Reed:

This from Hank Shteamer:
GQ: What were each of your preconceptions of the other before you started working on this project?

Lou Reed: I've loved Metallica since I was a kid.

Lars Ulrich: The reason we formed was to fulfill Lou's vision of one day working with us. I think we go back not only many years; we go back many lives, many planets, many solar systems.

GQ: I didn't realize! I'm curious, though, because Metallica has always been very vocal about its influences: Misfits and Diamond Head and things like that. But we've never really heard you talk about the Velvet Underground.

Lars Ulrich: Lou, the Velvet Underground, his solo material, the New York scene, all of that was inspirational to me in a bigger picture, get-out-of-bed type of way. Find a way to get on board and change the world in your own little way. Diamond Head and the Misfits and some of that stuff, they were more of a direct musical influence. This is more inspirational—on the level of wanting to be alive and wanting to do things to the best of your ability.

When I was growing up in Denmark in the '60s, my father [tennis player Torben Ulrich] had a steady stream of people through the house—jazz musicians, writers, and poets filtered through the door, to a soundtrack of everything from the Doors, to Jimi Hendrix, to the Velvet Underground, to Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane, and Sonny Rollins.

Lou Reed: Dexter Gordon.

Lars Ulrich: Dexter Gordon, right. [Gordon was Ulrich's godfather.] It was a pretty rich cultural household and upbringing. What I got from my father in those years before I rebelled was to try to be open to all these things that were going on in the house.

Read the entire interview here.

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